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Winter Solstice

The winter solstice is the shortest day and longest night of the year when the sun appears at noontime to be at its lowest altitude above the horizon of the year. It occurs around December 20-22 in the Northern Hemisphere and around June 20-22 in the Southern Hemisphere. The winter solstice marks the moment when Sun is at ...
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Saturnalia

Saturnalia was an ancient Roman holiday held from December 17th or the first day of Capricorn, the house of Saturn and lasted from one to five days variously through its history. The celebration of Saturnalia continued into the 4th century C.E. Like many Roman festivals, Saturnalia had public and private ...
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Tansy

Tanacetum vulgare A member of the compositae family has diagnostic yellow flowers similar in form to dandelions, but much more compact and lacking rays flowers. The flowers appear in heads in late summer and early autumn. They smell somewhat like camphor. The foliage is fern-like and the leaves are alternate, ...
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Violet

Viola spp Other Names pansies, heartsease, viola, violetta There are about 500 species of violet around the world. Most are small perennial herbs, but there are some annuals and shrubs in the family as well. Most have heart-shaped, scalloped leaves (though some are palmate) and the flowers have four up-swept ...
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Rosemary

Rosmarinus officinalis Other Names Polar Plant, Compass-weed, Compass Plant, Rosmarinus coronarium, Incensier General Information An evergreen shrub native to the Mediterranean, rosemary has spruce-like leaves that are green on the top and whitish beneath. In the spring and summer, the plant may put out blue flowers if the weather is humid ...
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Poppy

Papaveraceae spp The poppy is a common wildflower in many parts of the world including North America, Asia and Europe. It is often found growing in fields, both wild and cultivated grain fields. There are many varieties of poppies in just about any color you could wish for. The bowl-shaped ...
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