Fire

Fire is associated with the energy of life and in many traditions is considered the mouth of the Gods as it is used to deliver offerings. Fire is the soul, the driving force, it is energy! Fire is the passion behind creation, the obsession behind destruction. The necessary destructive force that brings about new life. Fire is creative and destructive, desirable and dangerous, necessary and threatening.

Fire in Ritual

Traditional Wicca hails Fire from the South, although it can be called from any direction one feels it connected to, usually the direction of the Sun. If you live in the Southern hemisphere, you may want to call Fire from the North since the equator, and warmest part of the planet is North of you. Fire is sympathetically related to candles and blades or wands depending on your tradition. These items are often used to represent fire in rituals and on altars.

In Ceremonial Magick corresponds fire to the wand or rod.

Literal fires, in the form of bonfires, candles, braziers, etc. are used in ritual to activate a spell and to send offerings or messages to the Gods via burning. Passing items through fire or smoke are methods of ritual purification. Driving animals (or in modern times, automobiles) between fires is a traditional purification ritual at Beltane or Samhain. Jumping the fire is traditional at Beltane for purification and to ensure a prosperous year. In modern times, jumping over or dancing around a lit candle is often considered a suitable and safer alternative, especially if access to the outdoors is limited.

Fire for Magick

The element of fire can be utilized in spells related to energy, sexuality, passions, love, authority, transformation, purification, healing of the blood and head, destruction, will, creativity, ingenuity, innovation, invention, enthusiasm, the family and hearth, kitchen witchery, protection, courage, strength, physical exercise, self-knowledge, loyalty, vision, illumination, power.

Fire is used ceremonially to activate oils and incense and to release intent through burning as well as to present offerings to the Gods.

Elemental Correspondences of Fire

Fire is active, warm, dry, bright, and masculine. It can be represented on the altar with a candle or a fire bowl or a blade.

Season: Summer
Day: Sunday
Moon Phase: Waxing
Time: Noon
Archangel: Michael
Chakra: Solar Plexus
Incense: Cinnamon, Frankincense, dragon’s blood
Sabbats: Beltane, Samhain, Midsummer, Lughnassadh
Zodiac Signs: Aries, Leo, Sagittarius
Animals: Lion, dragon, salamander, snakes, coyote, fox, mantids, scorpion, Phoenix, ram, squirrel
Alchemical Symbol: Triangle with the point up
Symbolic Posture: Standing straight forming a triangle over the head with arms
Tarot Card: Judgment(XX),  Wands (Sometimes swords, depending on Tradition)
Planets: Mars, Sun, Pluto
Elemental Spirits: Salamanders, Sprites, Djinn
Body Part: Head
Colors: White, Red, Orange, Gold, Scarlet, Crimson, Fuchsia, Maroon
Symbols: Flame, Sun, Stars, Volcanoes, Lightening bolt, Double-headed Axe (Labrys)
Gods: Vulcan, Ra, Agni, Hephaestus, Horus, Atar, Chu-Jung, Mars, Aten, Brigit, Freya, Hestia, Pele, Vesta, Durga, Elena, Aetna, Yansa, Themis, Agni
Magickal Tools: Fire, Wand, Lamp, athame, Candles, Dagger, Sword, Burned Herbs, Requests on Paper

Fire Minerals
Minerals related to the element of fire are often protective in Nature. They are usually bright and reflective and may be red, orange, or yellow in color. Those metals used in forging are sometimes said to correspond with fire, especially if they have been through the forging process. Volcanic stones also tend to be associated with the element of fire.

Gemstones: Red Jasper, Bloodstone, Garnet, ruby, Quartz Crystals, Carnelian, Tiger’s Eye, Rhodochrosite, Agate, Fire Opal, Lava or any volcanic stone such as obsidian or pumice

Metals: Gold, Nickle, Steel, Brass

Fire Herbs
Herbs that correspond with the element of fire tend to cause a warming sensation when smelled, touched, or eaten due to the presence of various chemical constituents or a sensation of pain due to the presence of thorns or spines. They are often protective or anti-inflammatory in nature. Some plants that are traditionally burnt are associated with the element of fire on that basis alone.

nettles, allspice, basil, garlic, hibiscus, juniper, onion (and all alliums), red pepper, red poppy, thistle, almond tree, cacti, chile peppers, cinnamon, mustard, tobacco (nicotiana), most nuts, seeds and pods
Fragrances clove, patchouli, bay, chamomile

Fire in Dreams

In a dream, Fire can be a purifying element; it can relate to anger, to lust, passion, or destruction. Its appearance signifies a major change happening.

Learn More Online

http://web.eecs.utk.edu/~mclennan/BA/AGEDE/Fire.html
http://thriceholy.net/Texts/Moon.html

2 thoughts on “Fire

  • March 30, 2020 at 4:45 am
    Permalink

    Everything I have found to date says the Tarot suit of Swords is akin to Fire and Wands is akin to Air.
    Just curious 🙂 is this a misprint or do I need to double check my information?

    Reply
    • March 30, 2020 at 10:27 am
      Permalink

      I have always felt that corresponding wands to fire did not make sense because fire consumes a wand but aids in the creation of a sword and a wand is made of wood and trees create air so it stands to reason. HOWEVER, there are other traditions far older than my logic that disagree. Several ceremonial magick traditions (Golden Dawn has made significant advances in Tarot) insist that the wand is fire and the sword is air and their members, former members and people in related traditions have created many decks based on this symbology as well as their numerology traditions. I have been corrected in both directions. I have checked some sources and found that yes, indeed, there are several that say wands for fire (In fact, the very first search engine result gave me this https://tarotelements.com/minor-arcana-correspondences/ ), and there are still several that say swords. So I dug out my old Tarot decks, (I admit I haven’t looked at them for some time being an augury girl myself) and looking at both the Robin Wood Tarot and the Rider Waite, I am finding that Robin Wood seems to take care to show the Swords in cloudy, airy scenes with bright shining wands. Rider Waite doesn’t seem to take such care (the wands have leaves, which make me feel air) but the swords are still showing a lot of clouds. When we look at the meaning of the cards, we find that swords are about ideas and thoughts (and sometimes travel) which are air corresponding ideas and wands are about creativity and action which correspond to fire, at least in the system represented by these cards.

      Remember that the tradition of the person creating the cards is going to make a big difference in the symbolism that is used. Changing the correspondences and symbolism will change the meanings of the cards. That is okay but some will argue that they are no longer Tarot cards, but oracle cards, or fortune-telling cards or whatever. However, Tarot was originally a game. It wasn’t invented as a complete divination system but has evolved over time. I think the basic idea of the game card set turned to divination can be embraced by anybody using whatever meanings and symbolism suits them. (Just like some people use ordinary playing card decks.)

      So, I am just going to update this to say sometimes wands, sometimes swords, depending on tradition.

      Reply

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