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Daisy

Bellis perennis or Chrysanthemum leucanthemum Discussing the common daisy is a bit problematic because there are so many plants that folks commonly refer to as daisies. The name daisy seems to be a general moniker for any rayed flower with long, white external petals surrounding a yellow disc. Varieties Bellis perennis, aka ...
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Demeter

Demeter is a Hellenic Mother Goddess, Grain and Harvest Goddess and founder of the Eleusinian Mysteries. According to the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, She withdrew her gifts from the world and brought about a famine when Zeus gave her daughter Persephone to Hades as wife and only relented when Persephone was returned to her. But, as Persephone had eaten ...
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Saint John’s Wort

Botanical Name Hypericum perforatum Other Names: Saint Johnswort, St. Johnswort, St Joan's Wort This is a bushy little perennial and very winter hardy. It grows well in zones 5 to 9 to about one to three feet tall. Leaves are small, stalk-less, opposite and pale bluish green growing up long ...
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Eyebright

Euphrasia officinalis Eyebright is an annual herb that is common to dry fields and pasture lands in its native Britain and also in the U.S. where it has become naturalized. It is about 2-8 inches high and bears spikes of small labiate flowers in white or purple veined with darker ...
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Rosemary

Rosmarinus officinalis Other Names Polar Plant, Compass-weed, Compass Plant, Rosmarinus coronarium, Incensier General Information An evergreen shrub native to the Mediterranean, rosemary has spruce-like leaves that are green on the top and whitish beneath. In the spring and summer, the plant may put out blue flowers if the weather is humid ...
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Volturnalia

Volturnalia was the Roman festival of the Volturnus, the God of fountains and the river Volturno. It took place on August 27th. The details of the feast day have not survived, but it is reasonable to assume it included feasting, games and sacrifices ...
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